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REAL Italian RISOTTO ALLA MILANESE /classic authentic recipe

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Risotto alla milanese

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Features

BindingMP3 Download
CreatorMazachigno
Genredance-and-dj-music
LabelSmoothnotes
ManufacturerSmoothnotes
Product GroupDigital Music Track
Product Type NameDOWNLOADABLE_MUSIC_TRACK
Publication Date2011-02-14
PublisherSmoothnotes
Release Date2011-02-14
Running Time187
StudioSmoothnotes
TitleRisotto alla milanese
Track Sequence12

Quando il piatto si tinge di giallo: il risotto alla milanese: La versione di Cracco

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Features

AuthorCarlo Cracco
BindingAudible Audiobook
CreatorCarlo Cracco; Audible Originals
FormatUnabridged
LabelAudible Originals
ManufacturerAudible Originals
Product GroupAudible
Product Type NameDOWNLOADABLE_AUDIO
Publication Date2018-03-09
PublisherAudible Originals
Running Time24
StudioAudible Originals
TitleQuando il piatto si tinge di giallo: il risotto alla milanese: La versione di Cracco

Se vuoi fare il figo usa lo scalogno. Dalla pratica alla grammatica: imparare a cucinare in 60 ricette

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Features

AuthorCarlo Cracco
BindingPaperback
EAN9788817067843
EAN ListEAN List Element: 9788817067843
ISBN8817067849
Item DimensionsHeight: 839; Length: 555; Width: 79
LabelRizzoli
ManufacturerRizzoli
Package DimensionsHeight: 94; Length: 843; Weight: 132; Width: 543
Product GroupBook
Product Type NameABIS_BOOK
Publication Date2013-08-01
PublisherRizzoli
Release Date2013-08-01
StudioRizzoli
TitleSe vuoi fare il figo usa lo scalogno. Dalla pratica alla grammatica: imparare a cucinare in 60 ricette

Knorr Quick Cook Risotto Milanese (175g)

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Features

  • KNORR

Groupe SEB Deutschland GmbH / Krups GmbH (FO) Lagostina La Risottiera 011193031724 Risotto Pan with Wooden and Stainless Steel Lid 24 cm 3.5 L

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Features

  • High-quality stainless steel
  • 5-layer Lagoplan base and triple-layer sides
  • Suitable for all types of cookers, including induction
  • Oven-safe
  • Lid made of a combination of cherry wood and stainless steel (not suitable for use in the oven or dishwasher)
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37 Comments

  1. BravingTheOutDoors

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    I’m not an expert in Risotto or what it’s supposed to be like and if to be dead honest what “real” Italian food I did eat never impressed me but something about the balance here doesn’t work for me.

    As a side note I’ll say that as per my taste many things Italians like just seem odd to me.
    I once ate at a very fine Italian restaurant and while the sauce was great the pasta, for me, wouldn’t even qualify as being cooked. It’s not that it was al dente… it was inedible.
    Similarly, the “cracker like” pizza, again, doesn’t work for me.
    The one time I did eat Risotto in a proper proper restaurant it was, again, too al dente for me.

    So back to this dish…
    I made it twice. Once a few months ago and once a few days ago and felt the same both time… it’s just too cheese-dominant for me.
    I want to ask questions but at the same time I don’t want them to come across as having negative connotation.
    I can only assume that it’s just me and my personal taste but I just feel that a lot of work is going into making this Risotto and in the end a lot of it is just being drowned and overpowered by the Parmesan.
    For instance, I just can’t taste the marrow. Not really.

    In case you were going to ask… trust me, I used the very best of ingredients you could possibly use.

    I’m aware Risotto is supposed to be creamy – hence the stirring, beating, and cheese.
    Still, I’m wondering if there’s a different way to achieve it or at least use less cheese or otherwise use one that doesn’t have such a dominant taste.

    Just wondering.

    Could just be that I’m just not a Risotto-person.
    I always liked hybrid dishes and ones that were inspired or fusion with Italian ideas but whenever I eat pure Italian food the way Italians like to eat it I just honestly don’t enjoy it at all. Always feels limited and narrow with very little complexity.
    Here, though, I feel like there's so much going on and in theory it should all work and produce layers upon layers of complexity but in the end most of what I taste is cheese… again, could just be me. Don't know… just sharing.

    I mean no offense to any Italian who might read this.
    JMHO.

    Reply

  2. slim jim Gaming

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Hey Chef – when do you add the actual marrow? Can't find it in the video at all. I have my bones in the oven as we speak.

    Reply

  3. Sean Healy

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Hi. What is the reason for freezing the butter?

    Reply

  4. Gern Blenstein

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Thank you for that awesome recipe, good sir! Chef's class is in session!

    Reply

  5. buddy smith

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Not bad! but the garlic is in the Osso Buco Gremolta!

    Reply

  6. Sean Healy

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    I've always wanted to make this but have dithered because of the bone marrow; now the time has come. Can I ask you about making the chicken stock? How long do you simmer the carcass bones?

    Reply

  7. arrivagabry

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    I'm sure it is very good, but I don't have all that time to spend in the kitchen and ending up eating it all in only 10 minutes so I make a quicker version. Next time you make this invite me for dinner 😉

    Reply

  8. BravingTheOutDoors

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    I have a bunch of questions… hope you don’t mind.
    I grew up in what was called a “steady” family (which is a different way of saying that my dad made a pretty big income) and so we went to restaurants quite frequently.
    I remember trying Risotto several times as a teenagers and never really liking it.
    I always felt it carried a minor metallic taste that always bothered me.
    Not the kind of metallic taste you get from cooking tomatoes in cast iron, the kind that is similar to putting a 9V battery on your tongue.
    So I tried to make it myself once or twice and it wasn’t that much better.
    I’m not sure what the cause of that was because at the time I didn’t know much about wine and I can’t recall what rice I used.

    Watching this recipe I’m realising you’re using a lot less wine.

    I guess my first question is whether you have any idea at all as to what I’m talking about or is it just me who’s different?

    Second question…
    I pretty much always have homemade veal stock, chicken broth, vegetable stock and demi-glace like reduction. I keep it all in my freezers.

    In this recipe you’re calling for a specific combination I haven’t seen before and I was wondering why that is.
    Why the “pure bone/meat” broths as opposed to a stock (with the mirepoix) that simply hasn’t been fully reduced?

    Reply

  9. Dominik Martel

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Hey chef! Little question here. Did you use all of the stock for this recipe? Because I used only 1 liter until the 17 minutes mark (it was awesome by the way). In my older recipe I was using 750 ml for 1 cup of carnarolli rice, so I suppose that 2.5 liters is a little bit too much? It would turn into a goopy mess 🙂 By the way, the osso buco was the best I ever had!!

    Reply

  10. Pegasis3

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Are there written instruction available for this recipe? Thank you

    Reply

  11. Jacky Ho

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Hi chef, great looking dish. I've got a question regarding the vinegar. Would it be a deal breaker if I substitute the apple cider vinegar with something else, say rice wine vinegar? What about skipping it altogether?

    Reply

  12. Mesha Wright

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    what type of white wine did you use I can't wait to try this recipe

    Reply

  13. Neutron

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Sorry, one more question; would you use this as a base for Arancini, or would you use a different risotto preparation? While we are at it, how about an Arancini video… 🙂  I'm completely geeking out on Italian these days.

    Reply

  14. Neutron

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    In a restaurant setting,  would you advise prepping to the "removal of garlic cloves" step at 14 minutes, and then finish during service with the saffron step till the end? Or does it work better to prep in its entirety and re-heat with water for service? If the latter, do you worry about carry-over cooking + re-heat will kill it?  Thanks!

    Reply

  15. Leftbanker

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Thanks for another terrific video. What is the theory behind the frozen butter? I can't wait to try this. I cook a lot of rice dishes since moving to Valencia, Spain where paella rules. I love risotto although I only make it once or twice a year. I never order risotto in a restaurant for the reasons you have mentioned.

    As for those saying you aren't respecting traditions I wouldn't even bother responding. You see the same thing on Youtube with the Valencia paella police who relish telling others how to cook yet have no videos of their own. Also, you have to sir risotto because that's what makes it risotto. The stirring releases the starch which makes it creamy. Paella isn't stirred at all and the rice maintains it integrity without releasing the starch. Rice in a pressure cooker? I don't think I'll try that.

    Reply

  16. Bob Builder

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    I just wanted to say I made this today and it tasted amazing. Thank you for posting all these great recipes. 

    Reply

  17. Vicious Suspicious

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Today was the second time I made this risotto. Man, it's such a great recipe. I have to admit that this was the first risotto I ever made. The video gives such great directions that I felt confident to make risotto for the first time. It was quite easy following this, so I don't get the whole fuss about it. Why are people so scared of making it? It's like trying to get your pasta to the 'al dente' stage. The flavour and the texture was great. I had risotto in Italy a few times and I can tell this is authentic and delicious.

    Reply

  18. RedRisotto

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Great video! I do my (any) risotto the same way (not a chef or Italian…) but never thought of boosting the temp in the end to move things along. Will try that. One question: why not stop the rice at 90% – 95% and then finish it off as orders come in (or finish off at home as needed) – with stock? I guess in a restaurant it's a about speed? Also, I like my risotto with a slight bite (not crunchy obviously…) Wife likes the baby food version. Nicely explained videos – subscribed (found you because of your beef stock). Don't stop.

    Reply

  19. Le Wang

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Man that's a lot of work …  thems were the days, slaving over a lot stove stirring and stirring.  Heh.  Now I do rice cooking part in the pressure cooking and results are just as good.  Have you tried it in a PC?  There are plenty of simple recipes for that floating around.

    Reply

  20. Mark chapman

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    i personally don't stir the rice, it makes its too gluggy i prefer to use a pan and lightly toss it.. give that a try.. it works really well

    Reply

  21. CookinginRussia

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    ATTENTION – if you are posting a question, please be sure that you have not set your YouTube preferences to block replies. I am seeing this more and more. If I can't reply, I won't reply (obviously).

    Reply

  22. JDAnatnom

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Chef, i'd love to see your interpretation of a good chili. Chili is my favorite food in the whole world and i'd love to see how an A+ chef like yourself would make it 🙂

    Reply

  23. ladybugfunk

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    you're doing a fabulous job!!! I love your recipes and techniques.  Sorry to notice but here will always be those haters who don't achieve anything in life other than bitching about something they think they can do something better than you. ha  hahaaaa hhhaaaaa!  Get your own show people!!!

    Reply

  24. shair00

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    When I was a child, i used to dig the brown goup out of the chicken bones from KFC. my father told me I was being gross, but I couldnt help loving the flavor that the chicken marrow produced. so when you want to add beef marrow to a dish I think would be wonderful, i have no objections. marrow taste great!

    Reply

  25. Ismail Fikri

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Why cider vineager ? Why not balsamic vinigar, or red wine vinegar ?
    What's the use of the marrow ?

    Thanks Chef  !! 🙂

    Reply

  26. NoButOneMe

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Born and raised in northern Italy, grown up eating risotto from my first memories.
    And honestly, your method for risotto is totally fine. I mean, i'd have to make a point or two about some minor details, but in the end it totally looks like it's at the right consistency. Many italians think that the tradition is ours so we must be the only ones who can really cook those dishes, the reality is italian foods can be cooked by anyone who respect tradition and love for cooking. Your risotto is not an insult to traditions, spaghetti with ketchup is.

    Reply

  27. Mike Lan

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    nice vid!

    Reply

  28. Vicious Suspicious

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Chef, I just saw this video and read the reactions, but couldn't believe what just happend here. Apparently, you are 'the American' that breaks the Italian tradition. Creamy rice? Seriously? Butter before and not after? If you guys are so great, why don't you start your own cooking channel? I would be glad to see you cook your traditional dishes. But attacking someone, while sitting at your desk is just the easy way. If you look carefully, you can see that he's working very accurate, because this is a professional recipe which you apparently don't get.

    There are tons of videos out there, even by Italians, who have nothing to do with tradition. I hope this doesn't stop you making Italian dishes. I'm glad I've seen this video. Using homemade broth and adding butter, never accured to me. I'm going to make this for sure!

    Reply

  29. Eric

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    I have some questions if you don't mind. 1. That is beef marrow bone right? 2. You say "I'll get the marrow out" that is discarded right? does the bone go back in with the chicken stock? 3. If I don't have roasted chicken carcass what is ratio of water to Knorr cubes? 4. You're just calling for regular Parmesan cheese?? Thank You.. 

    Reply

  30. A B

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    This looks great I'm definitely am going to try this. Also i ate at a Micheiln star restraunt for the first time and they had a cheddar risotto that was pretty good so I was wondering if this method works with other cheeses

    Reply

  31. L F

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Traditional dishes allover the world usually starts from the lower middle classes at that stage it's were you find lots of variations "as mama make them" which eventually get inherited  by us,,, but at the same time the most popular ones use to end up on the tables of nobles and politicians and become traditional national dishes this happens in every culture at that point is when the dish become traditionally stantardized….by people like Escoffier for France and Bergese for Italy….the recipe for Risotto Milanese was standardized already at the court of the long gone Italian monarchs …. so if you want it to call it Risotto Milanese and take pride in the hundreds of years of its history like you state in this video… please do it by tradition otherwise call it Creamy Rice or whatever….

    Reply

  32. mastocytoma1

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Guiliano,
    I guess the only way to cook TRUE Italian dishes is for the chef to be Italian? You speak nonsense! Cooking is art, and as such, should always be freeflowing and challenged. There should never be only one way to create something that pleases! Otherwise, it becomes stale and forgotten no matter what impact it once carried. 40 years of experience is nothing to scoff at either by the way. The truth is in the feedback received when his dishes are reproduced. Now granted, I am not an expert, but the great thing about food is you dont have to be to enjoy a dish! It either hits the spot or doesn't! Plain and simple! The best Italian food I've ever tasted was prepared by an Algerian chef by the way lol!! 😉

    Reply

  33. GIULIANO SCAPPI

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    I'm a teacher for more 'than 20 years of Italian cooking and more milan so .Compared only tradition, you can trust.

    Reply

  34. GIULIANO SCAPPI

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    dear chef, no garlic at the end risotto must be added the butter to the pan and shut off the heat with the cheese and then rest for 3 minutes and then mantecatura.

    Reply

  35. DannoCrutch

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Excellent! Never heard of that rice or using the marrow. Looks delicious. Yea, that stirring constantly thing is a pain in the ass, and I never have. I need to catch up on your videos. Been busy. Did recently make your meatballs again. Always delicious.

    Reply

  36. Louche Decay

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Looks great chef, thanks! Do you have a recommendation for the particular type of wine? I have some nice local pinot grigio that I've been waiting to use.

    Reply

  37. Natterjak2012

    October 31, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    Another great and authentic looking recipe, thank you. I wonder if you would consider making a video about the chemistry of onions and why recipes require them to be cooked differently and the different flavours which are achieved as a result. Seems they are such a versatile and ubiquitous ingredient but many of us follow recipe directions to sweat / soften / translucent / brown / caramelise them with little idea of why this is right for a given situation. Well ok, we all know why caramelised onions are used, but hopefully you see the point. It was eye opening to me that raw onions boiled in water for 2-3 hours become quite sweet and take on a milky appearance. If the onions were fried till translucent then boiled the same time would the taste be the same? I might have to try it.

    Reply

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